Back Neck Shaping- A Stab In the Dark

dragonbackThe back piece of my dragon sweater is off the needles and blocked.  I couldn’t seem to follow my own directions and had to rip out the entire thing back to the underarm bind off.  Apparently I cannot watch TV and knit at the same time.

I’ve noticed lately that many of my favorite shirts and sweaters not only have waist shaping, they also have shaping at the back of the neck.  Instead of researching what a normal back neck shaping curve looks like, I threw caution to the wind and mimicked my front neck curve with much less depth.  I’m hoping that I don’t regret my laziness after this thing is assembled.   It’s about an inch in depth.  I started the curve when I started the shoulder slope shaping.

Here’s a close up of the neck:

dragonbackneckIt looks a bit messy but it should work out okay once stitches are picked up for the collar… as long as it’s not too deep.

And, since I had so many stitches to reduce to get from the bust measurement to the shoulder-to-shoulder measurement, I ended up decreasing every row in the underarm.  I don’t think it looks too bad:

dragonbackunderarmThe first sleeve has been cast on.  I’m resisting the urge to over-complicate the sweater design by adding a motif of some sort up the sleeve.  Plain stockinette is a bit tedious but at least it goes quickly in-the-round.  I’m knitting the sleeves without a seam until the underarm to keep it fast and easy.

This project has been going a bit slow because I’ve been getting side-tracked with other things like painting yarns.  We keep having these strange warm & sunny winter days and I can’t resist the urge to haul my things out to the yarn and play with wet wool and color!  Here are some pics of my latest batch.  These hanks are a soft and cushy worsted weight superwash merino.  You can find them in my Etsy shop.  Dyeing yarn has become just about as addictive as knitting.  I’m definitely knitting something with painted yarns in my next project!  🙂

felicitycloseup3felicitycloseup4felicitycloseup

Dragons, Dyes, and an Awesome Hank Winder

dragonOne dragon is completed and the other one has been cast on!  I’ve been busy with other projects (like yarn dyeing) which has slowed down my knitting progress.  But I’m still super excited about the Drops Air yarn and my new dragon friend who I think I’ll call Steve.  To follow the shape of my store-bought sweater underarm curve, I settled on decreasing every row.  It doesn’t look too bad.  I’ve held the sweater piece up to my body and it looks like it’ll be a great fit.  Steve’s new wing isn’t as pretty as the original wing design but at least it isn’t in my armpit anymore.

silkyyarnsHere’s a peek at the yarns that have slowed down my dragon project.  I was in a more serene mood this time and produced subdued hues with my color mixing instead of the supersaturated colors of my last batch.  This yarn base is a superwash merino and silk blend that has a very pretty sheen.  2 – 100 gram hanks were dyed in each colorway so a larger project, like a shawl, could be made.  When my dragon sweater is finished, I may sneak some of this yarn out of my Etsy shop and cast on for a spring shawl.

I like to re-skein my yarns after they have been dyed because I feel like it better represents what the yarn will look like when it is knitted.  But, winding a skein isn’t an easy task without the right tools.  And, these tools can be a bit expensive.  So my super-sweet husband volunteered (after I begged and pleaded with him) to construct a skein-winder for me.  Here’s a home video of my daughter demonstrating how to use the new contraption that has saved me a lot of work!

My Dragon Wings Are Being Eaten by the Underarm!

dragonwingThere’s always some kind of snag when it comes to knitting.  For my latest sweater, I neglected to take the underarm curve into consideration when planning the placement of the dragon.  I didn’t realize this until the wing stitches were being consumed alive by the underarm decreases.

dragonwing2I’m going to have to rip back about 20 rows and but the wing is redesigned.  The new wing still looks pretty good and it will follow the curve of the underarm somewhat.

Speaking of underarms, I’m noticing that for a set-in sleeve to fit the curve of my body, the conventional bind off and every-other-row (EOR) decreases just aren’t cutting it.  My last sweater had so many stitches to decrease at the underarm that the underarm curve went up about 3 inches and looked a little strange with the EOR decrease approach.  Plus, this became a problem with designing my sleeve cap to match because I didn’t need to reduce so many stitches in the sleeve.  Using my store-bought sweater measurements, I’m finding that I have the same problem!  In order to match the shape of the store-bought, I must decrease every single row or do a double decrease every-other-row.  Here’s a close up of the EOR double decrease approach.

dragoncurve  Since I love my store-bought sweater, I’m going to trust the measurements taken from it and just ignore convention.  I really, really want this sweater to be a perfect fit.  The yarn is scrumptious and I just love the dragons.  Keep your fingers crossed for me please!

Bad Ass Dragon Sweater- The Beginnings

dragon sweater designAfter taking measurements from a favorite store-bought sweater and ordering “the softest and fluffiest yarn ever,” I’ve finally settled on a motif – dragons!  I wanted something to wander up the front of the sweater but didn’t really want anything floral or too sweet.  This is where Pinterest comes in really handy!  I’ve been collecting intarsia and color-stranded patterns there and browsed through them to find this lovely cross stitch dragon.  He was pinned from indulgy.com so I have no idea to whom I should attribute this gorgeous artwork, unfortunately.  This dragon was way too large to fit my sweater so I started free-handing on knitting paper in a rectangle that would fit my sweater front.

firstdragonMy first attempt produced a dragon that had a lot of line and little fill.  I was afraid that with the super fluffy yarn, he would get lost and he would look like scribbles on the sweater front.  So, I filled him in and came up with a more solid dragon that I’m now using in the sweater.  I think this new design can overcome the fluffy yarn, still be seen, and the eye can tell it’s a dragon.  If I were more confident in my sleeve-cap design abilities, I would write up a pattern in multiple sizes to share.  However, I’m not confident in designing with the set-in sleeve but please feel free to use the dragon chart in your own favorite sweater recipe!dragonsmall  (Of course, for personal use only, please.)

I’ve run my numbers and have cast on for this thing.  I’m super excited!  Dragons plus the shape of my favorite sweater plus the “softest and fluffiest yarn ever” should equal one bad ass sweater!  Maybe it’ll be done in time for the premier of Game of Thrones?!?  dragon half

I’m using a mix of color-stranding techniques and intarsia techniques.  I’ve never had to do this before but it seems to be working out.  There’s only one or two strange-ish stitches on the front that I think I can live with.

Below, there’s a peek at the back:dragon back Anyone else had to knit with a mix of these two techniques before?  And, because I’m not sure how much yarn to cut for my intarsia yarn butterflies, I’ve just left the whole ball of yarn hanging off the back.  This slows me down a bit because I untwist the lot of them each row.  Maybe I should just cut them and add new as necessary.  That would probably be much more efficient.

Here’s a close up of the sweater piece.  You can definitely get a feel for the fluffiness of the yarn.  And, you can see my little gnome helpers!  They are available in my Etsy shop, if you’d like some for yourself.  They really are a delight to knit with!  I love them._MG_6209

Plotting a Succesful Sleeve Cap- What a Learning Curve!

sleevecapfinalAfter four separate attempts, I’ve finally produced a wearable sleeve cap!  It’s a little embarrassing that I totally overlooked taking the around-the-arm shoulder-to-shoulder measurement and kept producing silly narrow sleeve caps, but at least I figured it out!  In case you missed it, you can catch up from my previous post, the sleeve cap nightmare.

The bottom line of sleeve cap design is that the sleeve cap must 1) fit into the armhole and 2) fit over your arm.  I was totally neglecting the second requirement!

Here’s a schematic of what was going on:sleevecurveMy sweater had a ton of ease that I had to reduce away to get the sweater narrow enough at the shoulders for the set-in sleeve.  This required a large bind off and then lots of reducing afterwards.  Most sweater design books suggest that your sleeve cap reduction mimic this curve.  But, as you can see, for my sleeve, this means that I’m reduced to only 6″ of fabric before I even get to the top of the sleeve cap.  I knit 2 narrow sleeve caps in a row and seamed them into place with disastrous results, as you can imagine.

Once I finally measured my arm from shoulder-to-shoulder and then measured the sleeve cap from an existing sweater, it dawned on me that I was reducing too many stitches in the initial curve.  Eliminating the steep reducing slope on my sleeve cap kept enough stitches to adequately cover my arm.  Yay for that!  It turns out that most adults need around 3″ on the final bind off and over 8″ in width across the upper arm.  Who knew?!?

I was so focused on making sure that the circumference of the sleeve cap curve would match the circumference of the armhole that I totally overlooked the width.  To ensure the pieces will match up when seamed, the rows on each piece have to match.  But since we’ve got that horizontal bind off of the sleeve cap to match with the vertical rows of the armhole, the bind off rows need to be translated into vertical rows.  Understanding this helps you determine how tall you can make the sleeve cap.

In the end, I’m glad I conquered my fear of the sleeve cap and on the fourth try, got it to fit.  🙂  Next time, I may plot out the sleeve cap before I knit the sleeve.  A little extra ease in the sleeve would have also given me more stitches to work with and the curves could have matched up a little more.

The Sleeve Cap Nightmare

sleevecapThe sleeve cap curve is a bit of a mystery to me.  It’s why I’ve stuck to raglan construction for most of my knitting life.  It’s not that I haven’t designed and knitted set-in sleeve sweaters but it’s always with a deep breath and my fingers crossed that the sleeve cap will fit correctly.   I just follow the armhole bind off and initial stitch reduction curve from the sweater body and then fudge it a bit until I get to the 3″ final bind off.  It’s worked for me until this sweater.

To dodge plotting the sleeve cap curve, I found an after-thought knit-in-place scheme.  This method worked okay when the sweater was all one color but you can see in the pic above that when you are dealing with stripes, it looks terrible.  There’s no avoiding plotting the stupid curve for this sweater.  Or, maybe it could be an ugly oversized vest?  Hmmmm.  Tempting!

sleevecap2My second attempt at the sleeve required knitting the sleeve in-the-round from the cuff up.  When I got to the sleeve cap, I took a deep breath and shaped the bottom exactly like my armhole and then reduced stitches on the way up while keeping an eye out for overall circumference so it would fit into the hole.  It was a half-success.  The cap fit into the hole but it looked ridiculous and pulled in on the sweater.  The pic doesn’t clearly show the spectacular awfulness of the sleeve cap but it was really bad.  Fail #2!

sleevecap3For the third attempt, I pulled out a sweater design book and skimmed through the sleeve cap section.  The information I gleaned- follow the sweater curve and leave a wider final bind off.  Easy enough.   Keeping an eye on the overall circumference, I knit the sleeve cap again and carefully seamed it in place.  Voila! – worse than the last sleeve cap!  This pic shows more clearly that my sleeve cap just isn’t wide enough.

Back to the drawing board!  After reading more extensively and taking my shoulder-to-shoulder around-the-arm measurements, it’s became clear to me where my problem lies.  I cannot duplicate the armhole curve in my sleeve cap, which is counter to most of the advice in my books.  My sweater has lots of ease that I’m reducing away in the armhole.  If I follow that curve, I’m reducing my sleeve cap too much and it doesn’t fit around my arm.

The upside to all of this knitting and frogging and seaming and ripping, is that I’ve been forced to actually learn how to plot the dreaded sleeve cap curve.  While I still need to knit yet another one of these guys, I’m pretty confident that this one will not only fit into the armhole, but will also fit my arm nicely.  Time will tell.  Keep your fingers crossed for me, please!

Surgery to Lengthen the Sweater – Pictorial Guide

blocking2I knit a yellow stripe across the front of my sweater 2 rows shorter than all the other stripes.  I didn’t notice it until all my ends were woven in and the piece was blocking on my mat.  Despite my efforts to embrace this skinny stripe, to envision it as a design feature, I cannot love the skinny stripe.  I don’t want to rip out all my knitting and undo all the weaved ends.  So, it’s time to get out my scissors and tiny circular needles to take care of this problem!  If you’ve got a short knitted piece, it’s easy to lengthen, especially if knitted in stockinette stitch.

lengthen10First things first, pick up the right leg of each stitch across the center of the piece with a tiny needle.  The tiny needle makes getting into the stitch easier for me.

lengthen9Next, cut the yarn of a stitch in the row immediately above the picked up row.  I do this to make it clear what stitches to pick up above.  As you pick at the cut yarn, you will notice loops from the row above.  Put those loops on another tiny needle as you pick the cut yarn out of the knitting.

lengthen8As you start picking out the cut yarn, it becomes clear what row of loops to pick up.  Turn your knitting around so the top of the piece is closer to you to make it easier to pick up those loops.

lengthen7Now pull out the yarn from the cut row in both directions until you have completely separated the top of your knitted piece from the bottom.

lengthen6You should have the same number of stitches on both needles.  Now, grab a fresh yarn and knit the missing rows with a needle size that gets gauge.

lengthen5Next, you just need to graft those two sides together.  You’ll need a long piece of yarn.  I generally cut a piece of yarn that is 5-6 times the width of the piece.

lengthen3Now get to Kitchener stitching!

lengthen2And voila!  You’ve got a stripe that fits in with the others!  A little bit of wet blocking and the grafting will look exactly like your other rows.

lengthen

How Do You Really Block a Sweater?

blockingAs my newest sweater piece came off the needles, contradictory advice on wet blocking swirled in my head.  I’ve been on a bit of book binge and have purchase some new knitting books:  “Finishing School” by Deborah Newton and “Knowledgeable Knitter” by Margaret Radcliffe.

Ms. Newton is a pattern designer and declares that “less is more” when it comes to blocking- with the caveat that you should treat your swatch as you would your finished garment.  She talks about taking your hand-knits to the dry cleaners and that a little bit of steaming is generally enough. Ms. Radcliffe, on the other hand, extols the virtues of wet blocking and highly recommends wet blocking your pieces before assembly.  She says that many yarns can be wet blocked.  In fact, the manufacturers will generally say “dry clean” if they feel a dye may run and that water will not damage the fiber.  The two books take very different approaches to blocking.

blocking3I suppose if the main purpose of your garment is to be photographed for a magazine and not worn regularly, then wet blocking (aka hand-washing) isn’t crucial.  So, steaming is enough as your sweater will never see water in it’s entire life.  But, if like me, you plan on wearing your handknits, and eventually hand-washing, then wet-blocking both your swatch and your sweater is very important!  At least that is the conclusion I have drawn.

I don’t mean to pick on Ms. Newton or her book.  In fact, there is a goldmine of information in there.  The blocking piece just confused me for a while because I’ve just recently gotten into the habit of wet-blocking my swatches because of former knitting disasters and the “less is more” advice had me second-guessing myself and scratching my head.  🙂

blocking2My latest sweater is a stash buster.  I’m going for a crazy, garish, super-comfy sweater.  I’m planning on knitting the other side of the front with different colored stripes to add to the obnoxious-ness of the sweater.  So far, only the front left piece completed.  I’m holding a fingering weight yarn double and the two-colors-at-a-time approach gives each stripe at heathered appearance which I like.  The yarn is Palette from Knit Picks that was in my stash.  I’m going to try to knit projects from my stash for a while to see if I can get to a point where I can open my yarn cabinet without yarn jumping off the shelves at me.  After 4-5 sweaters, I should get my stash down to a reasonable size.

KnitBookUsing a technique picked up from yet another knitting book, The Big Book of Knitting, I’ve inserted diagonal pockets into the front of the sweater.  I think they are a little on the small side but it’s not worth it to me to rip them back.  Perhaps during finishing, I could rip out the sewing and pick up stitches and extend the pockets all the way to the center.  We’ll see.

And, I notice on the blocking mat that the center yellow stripe is 2 rows too short!  It’s not a huge, big deal as long as I match the short stripe on the right side and back pieces.  My sweater will just be .25″ shorter than I planned.  I’m just glad it didn’t happen in the arm hole.  No one likes squeezy armholes!  I suppose I could perform surgery on this sweater to add back the stripes like I did with my lounger socks.  Hmmm… maybe surgery is in order.

socksurgery4This sweater seems to be flying off the needles since I’m not writing a pattern at the same time.  And, I’ve ordered a purple metal zipper for the front closure from an Etsy shop.  I really love Etsy.  There are some amazing hand-made things on there in addition to the entire section of craft supplies.  I’ve got my eye on an interchangeable knitting needle case.  Is it not the best design for interchangeables?  My current interchangeable needle storage method is the “stuff them all into a drawer” method.  This would be a HUGE improvement.

Conspiracy Sweater- Free Pattern

pdfbutton

illuminatiDoneAn all-seeing eyeball floats above golden bricks and is all dressed up with a bow-tie!  Whether or not you are familiar with the character of Bill Cipher from Gravity Falls, this sweater is an eye-catcher.  🙂  Lots of ease and full sleeve make this oversized sweater a very comfortable fit.  This pullover is knit in the round from the bottom up until the intarsia panel.  After the shoulders are seamed together, stitches are picked up around the armhole and a sleeve is knit in place down to the cuffs.

Shown in size XL with 4 inches of positive ease.

Skill Level– Intermediate
Sizes– sm (med, lg, xl, 2x, 3x)
Finished Measurements (Chest) in inches– 35.5 (40, 44, 48, 53, 56)
Yarn– Knit Picks Brava Worsted (or other worsted weight yarn). Approximately 880 (1020, 1200, 1310, 1500, 1610) yds of MC (Custard) yarn, 150-200 yds of SC (Caution) yarn, 220 yds of Black yarn, 155 yds of White yarn.
Gauge– 4.5 stitches per inch and 6.25 rpi in stockinette with size 7 needle
Skills Required– Knitting in the round, intarsia, crochet chain, seaming.

conspiracysweaterdiagramDirections
CO 160 (180, 200, 216, 240, 256) sts. Join for working in the round, being careful not to twist. Place marker at BOR.
Ribbing: K 16 round in 2×2 ribbing. Note: this ribbing is set up by *k2, p2 * repeat to the end of the round. On all subsequent
rounds, knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches.
Bricks
The bricks are made by purling where the vertical brick lines belong. During the finishing of the sweater, you will come back
to the bricks and crochet in the vertical brick lines over the purled stitches with your SC yarn.
Brick Line Round: With SC, k all sts.
Even Round: With MC, k all sts.
First Brick Round: With MC [k15 (17, 19, 17, 15, 15), p1]* *repeat to EOR.
Repeat First Brick Round a total of 7 times.
Brick Line Round: With SC, [k15 (17, 19, 17, 15, 15), p1]* *repeat to EOR.
Even Round: With MC, k all sts.
Second Brick Round: With MC k8 (9, 10, 9, 8, 8), p1, [k15 (17, 19, 17, 15, 15), p1]* *repeat until 7 (8, 9, 8, 7, 7) sts remain, k to EOR.
Repeat Second Brick Round a total of 7 times.
Brick Line Round: With SC, k8 (9, 10, 9, 8, 8), p1, [k15 (17, 19, 17, 15, 15), p1]* *repeat until 7 (8, 9, 8, 7, 7) sts remain, k to EOR.
Even Round: With MC, k all sts.
Third Brick Round: With MC [k15 (17, 19, 17, 15, 15), p1]* *repeat to EOR.
Repeat Third Brick Round a total of 7 times.
Brick Line Round: With SC, [k15 (17, 19, 17, 15, 15), p1]* *repeat to EOR.
Even Round: With MC, k all sts.
With MC, k80 (90, 100, 108, 120, 128), place marker for halfway point, k to EOR.
With MC, k9 (14, 15, 14, 15, 15) rounds.
cipherIntarsia
With MC, k24 (29, 34, 38, 44, 48), place chart marker, work Chart A over next 31 sts, place chart marker, k23 (28, 33, 37, 42, 47), k2tog, sm, k to EOR, CO 1 st. Turn work.
You will now be working back and forth for the rest of the sweater body. The cast on sts will be consumed and hidden in the side seam of the sweater during finishing.
Set Up Row (WS): P until you reach a chart marker, sm, work Chart A over next 31 sts, sm, work to EOR, CO 1 st. Turn work.
Even Row (RS): K until first chart marker, sm, work Chart A over next 31 sts, sm, k until EOR. Turn work
Even Row (WS): P until you reach a chart marker, sm, work Chart A over next 31 sts, sm, work to EOR. Turn work.
Repeat these 2 rows a total of 22 times. Work one more Even Row.

Underarm Shaping
Bind Off Row (WS): BO 6 (8, 10, 11, 14, 15) sts, p until 5 (7, 9, 10, 13, 14) sts berfore side marker, BO next 10 (14, 18, 20, 26, 28) sts and remove side marker when it is reached, p until chart marker, sm, work Chart A over next 31 sts, sm, p until EOR.
You will now be working only the front half of the sweater.
Bind Off Row (RS): BO 6 (8, 10, 11, 14, 15) sts, k2tog, k until chart marker, sm, work Chart A over next 31 sts, sm, k until 3 sts remain, ssk, k1. Turn work. 68 (74, 80, 86, 92, 98) sts.
During underam shaping you will reach the last row of Chart A. After the you work the last row of Chart A, all sts will be worked in stockinette stitch with MC.
Even Row (WS): Work all sts in established pattern.
Decrease Row (RS): K1, k2tog, work sts in established pattern until 3 sts remain, ssk, k1.
Work these 2 rows a total of 4 (5, 5, 5, 5, 5) times.
Work one more Even Row (WS). 58 (64, 70, 76, 82, 88) sts
Size Small Only: Work in stockinette for 2 rows.

Neck Shaping
Small (Medium) Sizes: K20 (22), move next 18 (20) sts to stitch holder or waste yarn. Add a new ball of yarn and k across remaining 20 (22) sts.
Working each side separately in st st, at each neck edge BO 4 (6) sts, then BO 2 (2) sts. Then dec 1 st at neck edge every RS row 2 (3) times. 13 (13) sts per side remain.
Large (XL, 2X, 3X) Sizes: K1, k2tog, k22 (24, 27, 30), move next 20 (22, 22, 22) sts to stitch holder or waste yarn. Add a new ball of yarn and k22 (24, 27, 30), ssk, k1.
Working each side at the same time with their separate balls of yarn in st st, at each neck edge BO 5 (5, 5, 5) sts, then BO 2 (2, 2, 3) sts. Then dec 1 st at neck edge ever RS row 3 times. At the same time, decrease 1 st at armholde edge every RS row 1 (3, 6, 7) more times. 13 (13, 13, 14) sts per side remain.
All sizes: Work both sides of front in st st until piece measures 6.5 (7, 7.5, 8, 8, 8.25) inches from underarm bind off (about 40 (44, 48, 50, 52, 56) rows from underarm bindoff) ending with a WS row.
illuminatiDone2Front Shoulder Shaping
Row 1 (RS): Still working each side separately but at the same time, k to the last 4 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to front, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to back. Turn.
Row 2 (WS): p to the last 4 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to back, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to front. Turn.
Row 3 (RS): k to the last 6 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to front, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to back. Turn.
Row 4 (WS): p to the last 6 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to back, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to front. Turn.
Row 5 (RS): k to the last 10 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to front, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to back. Turn.
Row 6 (WS): p to the last 10 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to back, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to front. Turn.
Row 7 (RS): K across, picking up wraps and knitting them together with their respective stitches.
Row 8 (WS): P across, picking up wraps and purling them together with their respective stitches.
Row 9 (RS): BO all sts.

Sweater Back
Add new yarn and begin on right side of work on back sweater sts.
Decrease Row (RS): K1, k2tog, k until 3 sts remain, ssk, k1.
Even Row (WS): P across.
Repeat these 2 rows a total of 5 (7, 9, 10, 13, 14) times. 60 (62, 64, 68, 68, 72) sts.
Work in st st until piece measures 6.5 (7, 7.5, 8, 8, 8.25) inches from underarm bind off (about 40 (44, 48, 50, 52, 56) rows from underarm bindoff) ending with a WS row.

Back Shoulder Shaping
Row 1 (RS): K to the last 4 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to front, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to back. Turn.
Row 2 (WS): P to the last 4 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to back, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to front. Turn.
Row 3 (RS): K to the last 6 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to front, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to back. Turn.
Row 4 (WS): P to the last 6 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to back, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to front. Turn.
Row 5 (RS): K to the last 10 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to front, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to back. Turn.
Row 6 (WS): P to the last 10 sts, slip next stitch pwise, yarn to back, return slipped stitch to left needle, yarn to front. Turn.
Row 7 (RS): K across, picking up wraps and knitting them together with their respective stitches.
Row 8 (WS): P across, picking up wraps and purling them together with their respective stitches.
Row 9 (RS): BO all sts.

Seaming
Sew front shoulders to back keeping arm holes aligned. Sew side seam closed.

illuminatiDone5Sleeves
Starting at center bottom of the armhole, pick up 58 (60, 72, 82, 92, 98) sts evenly around arm hole.
Place shaping markers 9 (10, 12, 13, 15, 16) sts from both sides of bottom center of the armhole. Place short row markers 9 (10, 12, 13, 15, 16) sts from both sides of top center of armhole.
Row 1 (RS): Starting at BOR at the bottom of the armhole, join to work in the round and k until second short row marker. W&t next stitch.
Row 2 (WS): P to first short row marker. W&t next stitch.
Row 3 (RS): K to wrapped st, pick up and knit wrap with respective st, w&t next st.
Row 4 (WS): P to wrapped st, pick and purl wrap with resspective st, w&t next st.
Repeat these 2 rows until you reach the shaping markers.
K across on the right side until you reach the wrapped stitch, pick up wrap and knit together with respective stitch, knit to EOR.
You will now work in st st for 66 (72, 74, 74, 74, 74) rounds while reducing 1 st at the beginning and end of a round every 15 (15, 15, 15, 12, 10) rounds 4 (4, 4, 4, 5, 6) times to reduce a total of 8 sts. On your first full round, when you reach the wrapped st, pick up wrap and knit together with st. You can remove all markers except the BOR marker.

Bricks
Sizes Small (Xl, 2x):
Brick Line Round: With SC, k1, k2tog, k until 3 sts remain in round, ssk, k1.

Sizes Medium (Large, 3x):
Brick Line round: With SC, k1, k2tog, k until EOR.

All sizes:
Even Round: With MC, k to EOR.
First Brick Round: With MC [k15 (16, 20, 17, 19, 16), p1]* *repeat to EOR.
Repeat First Brick Round a total of 7 times.
Brick Line Round: With SC, [k15 (16, 20, 17, 19, 16), p1]* *repeat to EOR.
Even Round: With MC, k to EOR.
Second Brick Round: With MC k8 (8, 10 9, 10, 8), p1, [k15 (16, 20, 17, 19, 16), p1]* *repeat until 7 (8, 10, 8, 9, 8) sts remain, k to EOR.
Repeat Second Brick Round a total of 7 times.
Brick Line Round: With SC, k8 (8, 10 9, 10, 8), p1, [k15 (16, 20, 17, 19, 16), p1]* *repeat until 7 (8, 10, 8, 9, 8) sts remain, k to EOR.
Even Round: With MC, k to EOR.
Third Brick Round: With MC [k15 (16, 20, 17, 19, 16), p1]* *repeat to EOR.
Repeat Third Brick Round a total of 7 times.
Brick Line Round: With SC, [[k15 (16, 20, 17, 19, 16), p1]* *repeat to EOR. 48 (51, 63, 72, 80, 85) sts.
Reduce Round Sizes Small & Medium: With MC, [k1, k2tog, k2tog]* *repeat to EOR. 30 (31) sts.
Reduce Round Sizes Large, XL, 2X & 3X: With MC, k2tog for one round. (33, 36, 40, 43) sts.

illsleeveWrist Ribbing
Ribbing Set Up Round: [k2, p2]* *repeat to EOR while reducing 2 (3, 1, 0, 0, 3) sts evenly around. 28 (28, 32, 36, 40, 40) sts
With MC, [k2, p2]* *repeat to EOR. Repeat this round 13 times. Bind off loosely.

Neck
With smaller needles (size 5 or 6) pick up 108 (120, 128, 136, 140, 148) sts evenly around neck. 2×2 rib for 6 rows and BO.

Finishing
With SC and a size 4 crochet hook, crochet chain up the purled stitch “ditches” at the bottom of the sweater and the bottom of the sleeves in the direction they were knit to complete the bricks.
With black yarn and crochet hook, crochet chain around the eyeball to line the eye.
With tapestry needle and black yarn, embroider the eyelashes.
Weave in all ends.

Abbreviations
BOR – Beginning of Round
CO – Cast on
EOR- End Of Row/Round
p – purl
k – knit
MC – Main Color
SC – Secondary Color
sm – slip marker
St(s) – Stitch(es)
st st – stockinette stitch